Broad, sweeping changes to the rights of salaried Arizona employees were brought by the passage of The Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act in November of 2016.

Due to these significant changes, here is a helpful reminder of the legal rights afforded to salaried Arizona employees.

salaried employee rights

Overtime Pay May Apply to Salaried Employees

Overtime pay in Arizona is governed by federal law via The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

While salaried employees are usually exempt from overtime pay, this is not always the case.

According to Section 13(a)(1) of the FLSA, an executive, administrator and similar professionals earning $455 per week or more are not owed overtime by law.

Recent changes that took place after December 1, 2016 recently increased this figure to $913 per week.

Salaried employees who make less than this amount may be entitled to overtime pay under federal law, so talk to an Arizona employment lawyer if you believe you were unfairly denied overtime as a salaried worker.

Paycheck-Related Rights for Salaried Employees

The majority of employers are required to pay salaried employees at least twice a month and not more than 16 days apart.

Further, the payments should be made according to a regular schedule.

As an “at will” employment state, Arizona employers may terminate a salaried worker for any lawful reason.

However, if you were terminated, the Arizona employer is requires to pay all due wages within seven working days or the upcoming pay period’s end, whichever is first.

Salaried Employees Are Entitled to Equal Pay for Equal Work

Federal and Arizona law alike both require employers to pay employees of both genders equally for the same quantity, quality and classification of work.

While pay differences can exist based on years on the job, seniority, skills and similar distinguishing factors, no discriminatory and unlawful standards may be used to justify a difference in compensation.

Arizona Employee Rights to Time Off From Work

Nearly all Arizona employees, including salaried workers, will qualify for paid sick leave based on the recent changes brought by The Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act.

The minimum amount of sick leave you can expect to receive will be based on the size of the employer.

Companies with less than 15 workers must provide at least 24 hours of sick time, and larger companies with more than 15 employees are expected to provide a minimum of 40 hours of sick leave.

Further, workers must obtain one hour of Arizona sick leave time for every 30 hours of employed work they provide to an employer.

One key exception to these requirements is that new employees — defined as workers who have been on the job for less than 90 days — cannot use paid sick time.

Arizona law permits employees to use this sick leave time for their own medical issues as well as the issues of their family members.

A.R.S. §23-373 expressly states that paid sick time can be used for employees and their family in the following ways:

  • A public health emergency
  • Medical care for both mental and physical injuries, illnesses or health conditions
  • Handling domestic violence, sexual violence, abuse, stalking or similar issues that jeopardize the worker’s safety or the safety of a family member

Talk to an Arizona Employment Lawyer If You Believe Your Rights As an Employee Were Violated

These are just a few of the key rights you are afforded under Arizona and federal law.

Employees are also protected by federal and Arizona law from unlawful discrimination and termination.

If you have any reason to believe that your legal rights as a Phoenix employee were violated, talk to a Phoenix employment lawyer who will provide you with reliable legal counsel.

At the Tyler Allen Law Firm, we protect the rights of employees who have been treated unlawfully in the workplace.

Contact us online today for a legal consultation to discuss how we can help protect your legal rights.

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